Welcome to thatlinuxbox.com Friday, April 03 2020 @ 11:15 PM UTC

CentOS 5 on Dell Inspiron 8100 with Proxim RangeLAN wifi

View Printable Version
  • Tuesday, November 13 2007 @ 11:18 AM UTC
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 9,051
Linux, Open Source, and Tech Stuff

Share
  • Google Plus
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg

I recently installed CentOS 5 on my older Dell Insipron 8100. For wireless, I use a RangeLAN DS card (in Linux, this card uses the orinoco_cs driver and usually shows up as eth1). In previous versions of CentOS I had to manually identify the card by editing the wifi config files and possibly some other magic. CentOS 5 identifies this card just fine but does not function without a little bit of system tweaking. It seems that another kernel module named hostap_cs conflicts with the orinoco_cs module. I noticed that the status light on the PCMCIA card would continue to flash, instead of coming on solid when the card found the AP.

The fix is to blacklist the conflicting hostap_cs module so the system does not try to load it.

Edit this file:

/etc/modprobe.d/blacklist-compat

Add these lines and reboot:

# hostap_cs conflicts with orinoco_cs driver.
blacklist hostap_cs


Labeling on the Proxim card itself:

PC CARD 8430
H/W Rev. : 1.0
F/W Rev. : 0.7.6

The wifi card ident info:

# pccardctl ident
Socket 0:
product info: "PROXIM", "RangeLAN-DS/LAN PC CARD", "", ""
manfid: 0x0126, 0x8000
function: 6 (network)

I purchased for $15 from Geeks.com a few years ago (I'm fond of geeks.com for slightly older and cheaper computing gear).

Linux Games - Urban Terror

View Printable Version
  • Saturday, September 15 2007 @ 06:01 PM UTC
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 14,104
Linux, Open Source, and Tech Stuff

Share
  • Google Plus
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg

Sometime last year, I removed Microsoft Windows from my home computer and installed Ubuntu Linux. It was a tough decision, because I knew I would not be able to play 3D games like Counter Strike Source. I finally found a free multi-player 1st person shooter that is similar to CSS, fun to play, and performs just fine on my not-so-new computer (Athlon XP 2800+ with GeForce 4 Ti 4200). The game is named Urban Terror and is based on the Quake3 engine. Downloads are available for Linux, Mac, and Windows. Did I mention that it is free?

Screenshots:











Give Urban Terror a try:

http://www.urbanterror.net

A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection

View Printable Version
  • Sunday, January 14 2007 @ 05:39 PM UTC
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 2,180
Linux, Open Source, and Tech Stuff

Share
  • Google Plus
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg

"The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute the
longest suicide note in history."

This is a quote from Peter Gutmann's Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection.

The original document located here:

http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.txt


I have mirrored the content here:

http://thatlinuxbox.com/static/vista_cost.txt


Open Calendar Sharing

View Printable Version
  • Tuesday, November 21 2006 @ 02:39 PM UTC
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 2,457
Linux, Open Source, and Tech Stuff

Share
  • Google Plus
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg

CalDAV is the Open Standards approach to calendar sharing. It is a little bit late to the game, but adoption is accelerating. Support has been announced by vendors such as Apple and Oracle. The Open Source community has a number of projects underway to utilize this new standard.

General Articles on open calendar sharing:
http://software.newsforge.com/software/06/02/09/2140226.shtml?tid=74
http://ietf.webdav.org/caldav/home.html
http://www.educause.edu/LIVE057
http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/blogs/consortium/archives/000445.htm
http://tinyurl.com/ya8b8z

Open Source Projects:
Cosmo (CalDAV server) - http://cosmo.osafoundation.org/
Chandler (PIM / CalDAV client) - http://chandler.osafoundation.org/
Mozilla calendar clients - http://wiki.mozilla.org/Calendar:Home_Page

Introduction to Open Standards and Open Source Software

View Printable Version
  • Tuesday, November 21 2006 @ 02:31 PM UTC
  • Contributed by:
  • Views: 2,364
Linux, Open Source, and Tech Stuff

Share
  • Google Plus
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • LinkedIn
  • Digg

I gave a presentation at the 2006 Florida Association of Museums Conference (FAM) in July. I gave the same talk at Denison University in October.

Summary:
Avoid vendor lock-in. Preserve your ability to access your own data into perpetuity. Adopt open standards.

The slides are posted on the web:

UPDATE 10.17.2012 - The original links fell victim to Internet Information Decay. I mirrored a copy of the presentation here:

Introduction to Open Standards and Open Source Software (PDF)


These original links to the presentation are (sadly) no longer active:

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/omt/presenta...ndards.odp (Open Document)
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/omt/presenta...ndards.ppt (Microsoft PowerPoint)
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/omt/presenta...ndards.pdf (PDF)

User Functions

Login

Connect

thatlinuxbox.com is the home of Dan Stoner's Personal Blog, Photos, and More (opinions, rants, techno-babble, and possibly a few useful tidbits of knowledge).

Questions or Comments about this site? Contact danstoner _ at _ gmail.com.

RSS Feed for this blog

Other places to find me on the web:

Twitter

LinkedIn

GitHub

Support This Site

If you like something that you find on this site, please consider making a purchase through one of the links below or sending me an item from my Amazon Wish List.


The Clymb


Awesome VPS hosting by Linode.com